Language as a Symbol of a Fractured Country

Main Article Content

Vesna POŽGAJ HADŽI

Abstract

In this paper we look at the bipolar Serbo-Croatian language which has undergone various processes in the past two centuries: a) integration in the mid-nineteenth century; b) variation during SFR Yugoslavia, when a common, but not a ‘unique’ Serbo-Croatian language was promoted, and when national varieties were tacitly allowed within the borders of the republics; c) disintegration upon the fall of SFR Yugoslavia in the 1990s; and d) the promotion of successor standard languages (Croatian, Serbian, Bosnian, Montenegrin). In these processes, unitarian and separatist language policies have constantly changed, and many times the language has been a symbol (its name, script, certain lexemes, etc.) and a means of connecting with the national identity that the advocates of nationalist politics used to promote their political ideologies – by enforcing linguistic changes with the aim of creating as many differences as possible between ‘Our’ language and ‘Their’ language.


Following the historical and cultural context, the paper describes the period during the 1990s, which is marked by turbulent socio-political changes, showing that the tendencies towards the dissolution of Serbo-Croatian could have been expected. Two contradictory approaches to Serbo-Croatian and successor languages are further highlighted: on the one hand, it is considered to be a common, polycentric (standard) language realised in national varieties (Bosnian, Montenegrin, Croatian and Serbian); while on the other hand, these languages are considered to be separate standard languages with their own histories and language and cultural particularities. For that reason, forced linguistic changes are implemented by the language policies of the newly-formed states with the aim to preserve and strengthen national identities. This is illustrated by the examples of language nationalisation, including purist cleansing of lexis in Croatia, the enforcement of Cyrillic script in Serbia, the introduction of new phonemes/graphemes in Montenegro, and the nationalist education policy in Bosnia and Herzegovina. As a response to these language policies, a language document entitled The Declaration on the Common Language was published online in 2017. However, it does not offer any concrete solutions for different linguistic realities, but instead advocates the idea of language standardisation which has not been particularly successful in the past. It is therefore concluded that linguists should take into account the limited influence of politics on language and begin conducting systematic language research from the philological and cultural standpoint, putting political views and agenda aside.


要旨
本稿は、過去2世紀の間に様々な歴史的プロセスを経た両極言語セルビア・クロアチア語を考察する。a)19世紀半ばの言語統合の時代。b)ユーゴスラビア社会主義連邦共和国時代。すなわちセルビア・クロアチア語が唯一ではないが、共通語として推奨された時代であり、同時に国民の多様性が連邦共和国の地域内で暗黙のうちに承認されていた時代。c)1990年代のユーゴスラビア社会主義連邦共和国の崩壊にともなう共通言語解体の時代。d)後継標準言語(クロアチア語、セルビア語、ボスニア語、モンテネグロ語)の構築。これらのプロセスにおいて、統一主義と分離主義言語政策は絶えず変化し、何度も言語は、その名称、書記体系、特定の語彙などにより、国民のシンボルとして捉えられ、国家主義者が利用した国民的アイデンティティと結びつく手段となった。彼らは自らの政治的イデオロギーを促進するために、「我々の言語」と「彼らの言語」の間に可能な限り違いを強調し、言語的な差異を構築していった。


このような歴史的、文化的な文脈に従って、本稿は1990年代の状況について記述する。1990年代は急激な社会的・政治的変化によって特徴づけられる時代であり、セルビア・クロアチア語の解体が志向された時代である。この時期はセルビア・クロアチア語と後継言語に対する2つの矛盾するアプローチに大別される。一方では、セルビア・クロアチア語はボスニア・モンテネグロ・クロアチア・セルビアの共通(標準)言語であるという見方。他方、これらの言語は、独自の歴史と言語および文化を備えたものであり、セルビア・クロアチア語とは分離した別の標準言語であるという見方。そのため、連邦解体後の新たな国家体制の中で、国民的アイデンティティを維持・強化することを目的として、新たな言語政策に基づいて言語改革が行われた。すなわちクロアチアでの語彙の純粋主義的浄化、セルビアでのキリル文字の実施、モンテネグロでの新しい音素・書記素の導入、ボスニア・ヘルツェゴビナでの民族主義教育政策を含む、言語の国有化である。これらの言語政策を受けて2017年に『共通言語に関する宣言』がオンライン上に公表された。そこには異なる言語の現実に対する具体的な解決策には言及がないが、共通言語化のための基本的な精神が言及されており、それに従い、言語学者は言語に対する政治の影響が限定的であることを考慮し、政治的立場・政治日程とは全く別に、哲学的および文化的観点から体系的な言語調査を先導するべきであると結論づけられている。

Article Details

Section
Articles